Kirbyisms: Compilation Of Kirby Smart’s Greatest Quotes Kirbyisms: Compilation Of Kirby Smart’s Greatest Quotes

Kirbyisms: Compilation Of Kirby Smart’s Greatest Quotes

Kirbyisms: Compilation Of Kirby Smart’s Greatest Quotes

Athens

Kirbyisms: Compilation Of Kirby Smart’s Greatest Quotes


Georgia head football coach Kirby Smart took little time to make a name for himself as one of the nation’s elite coaches – – after all, he did take UGA to a national championship in just his second season in Athens.

Though Smart’s only racked up two full seasons worth of press conferences at UGA, we’ve been able to learn a lot about the Georgia alum; not only Kirby Smart the coach, but about Kirby Smart the person as well. It’s clear Smart is very bright, and not just because he can make the correct decision at the correct time in a football game. But when you listen to Smart speak, he always manages to say the right thing and he has clearly mastered the art of rhetoric. It’s obvious he likes to win, and he brings a fierce competitive spirit to any scenario. But it’s also certain that Smart understands there’s more to college football than winning.

Some of Smart’s quotes over the past two years, most notably last season’s title run, have made us think, some laugh, some have even made us shed tears, and some have proved inspirational.

Let’s relive some of Smart’s greatest quotes since his arrival as head coach in Athens…

We shall call these… Kirbyisms…

Kirby Smart after being hired by UGA:

“It’s hard to say that it gets any better to be at your alma mater and run a major college football program.”

“Let’s be honest. Georgia, if you get the best players in this state, you should be winning championships.”

“How do you play well? You practice well. You prepare well.”

“My goal is to outwork everybody in recruiting, sign the best players in the state, and turn these guys into the best team we can.”

Smart on young guys playing: (said on Friday, August 3rd.)

“If you’re good enough to play, you’re old enough to play.”

Smart on focusing on the College Football Playoff and cancelling out any distractions:

“Keep the main thing the main thing.”

Smart on taking care of business:

“Keep chopping wood.”

Smart recalls funny story from SEC Championship win:

“They open it up, we get them third and 10, we come with pressure, they call pass interference and I’m like going nuts. I’m over on the sideline ripping into the official just going nuts, chewing them out. Finally one of the players eventually turns over to me and goes, ‘coach, composure. Composure.’ If you know anything about me I’m passionate about the game. I pour my heart out on the field and I had kind of lost my composure.”

Smart after Georgia’s Rose Bowl win:

“Man, we stunk it up and played really bad.”

“But if it was a measure of heart attack, I would be on the Richter scale pretty high.”

“The players settled down and played with a little more discipline, passion and energy. It wasn’t like there was a magic sprinkle dust. We called the same defense called in the first half. We just played them better.”

“27 (Nick Chubb) and 1 (Sony Michel) have put this team on their shoulders and all they do is do it right.”

“I’m really proud of his (Jake Fromm) growth. I think he’s got a bright future.”

Smart after Georgia’s loss to Alabama in the national title:

“I think everyone can see Georgia is gonna be a force to be reckoned with.”

“I am very proud of this team and this university, and we’re not going anywhere.”

“This was an incredible opportunity for the University of Georgia. It’s our privilege to represent the institution, our fans and players, in what I think is one of the greatest events in all of sports, the College Football Playoff system.”

“These two young men sitting next to me, they meant more to Georgia than yards. A lot of heart and soul. A lot of fire”

Smart at SEC Media Days discussing any pressure for the upcoming season:

“Pressure is really a privilege. You should feel privileged to have pressure to win games.”

Smart on recruiting:

“I don’t recruit against Nick Saban. I recruit for the University of Georgia.”

Smart on handing out suspensions:

“I think it’s what’s best for that kid. Are you going to teach that kid a lesson for 10 years down the road by suspending him a game?”

“I think, as a coach, you have to be willing to do what’s best for the player. And you say what’s best for the player: is it better to give him a game suspension, three-game suspension, no suspension. I think each case may be different in that.”

Smart on his coaching philosophy:

“Welcome to the world we live in as coaches. You’ve got to figure out what you can do best and better to get these kids a chance to be successful. I think that comes through a lot of things – confidence, improvement, recruiting.”

“I think in order to push kids and coach kids the way we want to coach them, we’ve got to have their trust.”

Smart on the importance of recruiting:

“At the end of the day, if you’re not beating the teams on the road recruiting that you have to beat on the field, then you’re probably not going to win many championships.”

Smart on the SEC:

“When you talk about the SEC, you never get a chance to rest.”

Smart on the 24/7 job of recruiting:

“It never stops. It’s 365 recruiting. That cell phone you’ve got, these smartphones are the death of college coaching.”

Smart on his love for coaching:

“I don’t think I’ve worked a day in my life.”

Smart recalls unselfishness of Nick Chubb in the Rose Bowl:

“We had a situation in the Oklahoma game. It was a tight ballgame, I forget if we’d comeback and tied it up or maybe we’re down one touchdown — for all I know it was 100 to nothing because (Oklahoma) kept on scoring and scoring, I didn’t think we were ever going to stop them. But in the second half, Sony Michel, he gets popped right on the ball. Ball fumbles. Guy picks it up and returns for a touchdown. Nick comes up to me on the sideline and gets right in my ear and tells me, ‘Coach, put Sony in. I want him to touch it first.’ Well it wasn’t really his turn to touch it, it was Nick’s turn to carry it, but Nick wanted Sony to go back in to prove we had confidence in him because we knew we weren’t going to win the game unless he got back in rhythm, he got his confidence back. Sure enough that next drive, we gave it to Nick first, but Sony came back and made the run that will define that game. The last run. It’s unselfishness like that I hope all you award winners, and I want to thank each and every one of you, I hope you embrace that unselfishness — because it’s so rare in our sport.”

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